Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) is pleased to announce the winners of the Drinking Water Week coloring contest. “There when you need it” was the theme of Drinking Water Week. The contest was open to K – 3rd grade Cherokee County students. The coloring contest focused on the drinking water process from the source to the tap. Congratulations to all our winners!

Grand prize winner – Juliana Amplo from Cherokee Charter Academy  – 3rd grade

Second grade – 1st place – William Shaffer from Boston Elementary

First grade – 1st place – Holden Sampson from Ballground Elementary

Kindergarten – 1st place – Noah Alsobrook from Clayton Elementary School.

There were six additional honorable mentions. All winners received an icecream gift card. Thank you to all that submitted an entry! This year we had to get creative to reach the students since the students were not in the classroom.

Drinking Water Week 2020

Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) kicks off Drinking Water Week by celebrating tap water is

“There When You Need It”

CCWSA kicked off Drinking Water Week by encouraging consumers to recognize their tap water is “There When You Need It”. Drinking Water Week is May 3-9 this year. CCWSA and the American Water Works Association (AWWA) will observe Drinking Water Week by recognizing the vital role tap water plays in daily life, the infrastructure that is required to carry it to and from homes and businesses, and the important work of water professionals “behind the scenes”. “With so much changing around us nowadays, it is comforting to know that our tap water is readily available for hygienic and drinking purposes,” said AWWA CEO David LaFrance. “Even during the coronavirus pandemic, water professionals across North America continue to report to work to collect, treat and distribute water to ensure the health and safety of their communities.” To commemorate the week, water utilities, water organizations, government entities, environmental advocates, schools and other stakeholders throughout North America and beyond will encourage consumers to understand and appreciate their drinking water.

CCWSA recognizes the importance of water infrastructure during Drinking Water Week

CCWSA recognizes the infrastructure that helps to transport water from collection to treatment to consumption is “There When You Need It” during Drinking Water Week. Drinking Water Week is May 3-9 this year. [Insert organization’s name] and the American Water Works Association (AWWA) will observe Drinking Water Week by recognizing the vital role tap water plays in daily life, the infrastructure that is required to carry it to and from homes and businesses, and the important work of water professionals “behind the scenes”. “Our tap water plays a vital role in keeping each of us healthy and safe during the coronavirus pandemic,” said AWWA CEO David LaFrance. “It is important to recognize the critical role water infrastructure plays, every day, in ensuring our tap water is there when you need it for drinking, cooking, or hygiene.”

High-quality water is “There When You Need It”

Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has assured consumers that drinking water was safe to use as normal. The consistent and reliable quality of drinking water is at the heart of the theme for this year’s Drinking Water Week, “There When You Need It” which will be held May 3-9 this year. Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) and the American Water Works Association (AWWA) will observe Drinking Water Week by recognizing the vital role tap water plays in daily life, the infrastructure that is required to carry it to and from homes and businesses, and the important work of water professionals “behind the scenes”. Many communities are fortunate to have reliable access to safe water when they turn on the tap. In large part, this stems from the regular testing CCWSA is subject to ensure that regulatory standards for water quality are met. In fact, every water system must publish a Consumer Confidence Report (CCR), which details its water quality. You can find CCWSA’s CCR’s that go back to 2005 at ccwsa.com under the Our Water tab. “Shortly after the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a pandemic, the EPA and CDC each reminded us that we should trust our tap water as we normally would for hygiene and hydration,” said AWWA CEO David LaFrance. “This proved to be extremely important because handwashing is an important way to stop the spread of the virus. We couldn’t do that without high-quality drinking water.”

CCWSA commends water professionals during Drinking Water Week

CCWSA commends the hardworking men and women ensuring tap water is “There When You Need It” during Drinking Water Week which will be held May 3-9 this year. CCWSA and the American Water Works Association (AWWA) will observe Drinking Water Week by recognizing the vital role tap water plays in daily life, the infrastructure that is required to carry it to and from homes and businesses, and the important work of water professionals “behind the scenes”. Reliable water service used for hygiene, hydration, and cooking is critical to our health and safety throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. At the beginning of the pandemic, several health organizations recommended normal hygienic practices, including handwashing for 20 seconds, which would play an important role in slowing the spread of the coronavirus. “During these difficult times, we reflect on the heroic work of health professionals and first responders who place themselves in harm’s way to keep us all healthy and safe,” said AWWA President Jim Williams. “I’ve referred to the water profession as a “vocation of distinction” before. In these difficult times, it is also a vocation of heroism.”

Drinking Water Week activities include:

  • EnviroScape presentations: Due to continued social distancing we will be doing the Water/Wastewater Process Enviroscape Presentation through video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDaiYZyVdN8
  •  Water Plant Operations information: We were initially offering water plant tours but due to continued social distancing we have had to cancel. Here are two great videos that explain Water Treatment Plants and Water Towers. Tours will be available in the future.

*How do Water Towers work? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZwfcMSDBHs&t=80s

*How do Water Treatment Plants Work? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_ZcCqqpS2o    

  • Coloring Contest: Coloring contest sheets for students grades K-3rd can be obtained here and dropped off at the drive-through/dropbox at our main office – (140 W. Main Street) or just take a photo of the completed coloring picture and e-mail it to lori.forrester@ccwsa.com with students name/grade. One or more lucky winner(s) will be selected to win a $10 ice-cream gift card. The deadline to turn the coloring sheets is May 11th.

Model Water Tower Competition

“FROM TODAY’S YOUTH COME TOMORROW’S LEADERS – LET’S LEAD SOME TO THE WATER PROFESSION!” This is the mission statement of the planning committee for the Georgia Association for Water Professionals (GAWP) Model Water Tower Competition (MWTC). This annual competition was hosted by Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) in Cherokee County for the second time on March 6th, 2020 at E.T. Booth Middle School. This STEM activity focuses on students learning complex concepts such as hydraulic and structural efficiency while thinking green and using recycled materials. The competition expanded to include 3 schools this year: E.T. Booth, Creekland and Mill Creek Middle School. Approximately 150 students participated in the competition. They had a total of 8 weeks to plan, design and build their water towers. Each school had engineering professionals mentoring them along the way with design, structure, and functionality of the towers. Eight model water towers advanced to the county competition from each school. Prizes were given for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place plus superlatives. E.T. Booth MS’s water tower “Snow Day” took home the 1st place prize. Mrs. Reeder, from E.T. Booth, can proudly display the district MWTC waterdrop trophy. In total $4000 was invested into the MWTC from CCWSA, CedarChem, Bermex, Hayes Pipe Supply Inc, Freese and Nichols, Brown and Caldwell, Engineering Strategies Inc and Hazen and Sawyer. Thank you to all the volunteers that made the competition possible by judging and leading student activities. We are looking forward to this competition being a part of our educational programs for years to come.

Science and Engineering Fair

Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) recognized six Cherokee County students at the NWGA Regional Science & Engineering Fair on February 8th, 2020 at Alliance Academy for Innovation High School. The students were recognized for excellence in their projects that focused on the environmental field. Students excelled at all levels from elementary school through high school.

This was the first year that elementary school students participated in the regional science and engineering fair. Hunter Hawkins from Hasty Elementary School was recognized for his project “How can farmers solve the problem of erosion?“ Three students from E.T. Booth were recognized: Madeline May for her project “Which Homemade Water Filter is the Most Effective at Cleaning Water and Particulates?” , Lydia Wooley with her project “What are the Different Types of Microplastics and Inorganic Waste in the Lakes?”  and Victoria Ramos-Jackson with her project “Lead along the Roadways: Which has more Lead?” All three placed 1st and will be advancing to the Georgia Science and Engineering Fair. Two students from Woodstock High School were recognized: Isabel Plower with her project “The Effect of the FAS ll Pathway on Agro-Industrial Waste” and Brodie Solomon with his project “The Effect of Water Pump Filtration on Microplastics in Freshwater.” Brodie Solomon placed 3rd with his excellent project on Microplastics filtration (see photo below).   Isabel Plower placed 1st and will be advancing to the Georgia Science and Engineering Fair. The recognized students received a certificate, goodie bag and a $50 gift card.

Isabel Plower, Woodstock High School Science and Engineering Fair Winner

Will England presenting Madeline May with her CCWSA goodie bag

Brodie Solomon’s project on Microplastics filtration

Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) is pleased to announce the winners of the 2020 CCWSA student photography contest. The theme of the contest this year was the human water cycle. Students were asked to consider: Where does the water that you use every day come from? How does it get to your home, school, and local businesses? Where is it stored? How does fire protection fit into the cycle? Where does it go after you use it? What is the connection to food production and energy? Student photographers were challenged to capture interest and beauty in the human water cycle. The winning photographers did that beautifully!

In the 6th – 8th grade category Caleb Miller, 7th grade student from Creekland Middle School, is the winner with his photograph titled “Tower at Sunset.” In the 9th – 12th grade category Leila Raymond-Kaina, 12th grade student from Cherokee High School, is the winner. The students received a framed copy of their winning photograph and a check for fifty dollars. The photographs are proudly displayed at the CCWSA main office, Rose Creek Water Reclamation Facility (WRF), Fitzgerald Creek WRF, Riverbend WRF, Etowah River Water Treatment Facility, and H. Q. Lathem Reservoir.

Tower at Sunset By Caleb Miller

Photograph By Leila Raymond-Kaina

Lori Forrester, CCWSA Public Information Specialist, presents framed photograph and prize to Leila Raymond-Kaina at Cherokee High School