Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) recognized six Cherokee County students during the on January 28th at South Forsyth High School. There were five projects recognized for their excellence in the environmental field. The projects recognized were “Making Saltwater Drinkable” from Ascher Shostak (E.T. Booth Middle School), “The Effects of Essential Oils on the Survival Rate of Brine Shrimp” from Rebecca Slaten and Darion Spencer (River Ridge High School), “Watershed Work” from Laney Cline (Teasley Middle School), “Carbon Nanoparticles for Aqueous Heavy Metal Remediation Yr3”  from Krystl Wood (Woodstock High School) and “Fertilizer Effects on the Growth of Algae in Lake Water” from Kora Hansen.The students received a certificate and $50 gift card. CCWSA applauds the efforts of all the Cherokee County students.

6th grader Laney Cline’s Science Fair Project “Watershed Work”

L to R – Laney Cline, Krystl Wood, Kora Hansen, Lori Forrester (CCWSA Public Information Specialist), Darion Spencer, Rebecca Slaten, and Ascher Shostak.

CCWSA is conducting a student photography contest in which the student takes a photograph that depicts  “Plants & Animals Dependent Upon Our Water Resources”. The contest is open to all Cherokee County students K-12 (including home school students).  Click here for more information.

River Clean Up

Millions of tons of trash are left along our nation’s rivers and streams every year.  Roadside litter also makes it’s way into our waterways through storm drain systems.  All this trash takes away from the beauty and safety of our waterways.   That’s why CCWSA’s Annual River Clean Up is so important.  Join us in giving back to the community by helping clean up in and around our rivers in Cherokee County.  Fall is a great time to get outdoors and enjoy the beauty and wildlife as well as make a difference.   Bring the family or grab a friend and see how pristine we can make our rivers.  There are 2 work days to choose from or feel free to join us both days.  We sure could use the help!

Etowah River Clean Up – September 10, 2016

Little River Clean Up – October 15, 2016

Awards and Recognition

Facility of the Year and Platinum Awards

Georgia Association of Water Professionals awarded Platinum Awards to Etowah River Water Treatment Plant, Rose Creek Water Pollution Control Facility, and Fitzgerald Creek Water Pollution Control Facility.  GAWP also awarded Fitzgerald Creek the Water Reclamation Facility of the Year Award.  Congratulations to all the plants for their hard work.

(Picture L-R) Clint Blackwell, Mike Venters, Tripp Rietter, Marc Rosenberger, and Chuck Youmans (GAWP District 3 Director)

(Picture L-R) Clint Blackwell, Mike Venters, Tripp Rietter, Marc Rosenberger, and Chuck Youmans (GAWP District 3 Director)

 

STREAM Award

Metropolitan North Georgia Water Planning District awarded CCWSA a STREAM award for helping to develop a technically sound and comprehensive analysis of the entire Lake Allatoona/Upper Etowah River watershed. This enabled improved decision making and resource protection through plans for comprehensive monitoring, watershed assessment, and watershed protection.

(Picture L-R) Danny Johnson (Manager of the MNGPD), Boyd Austin (Chairman of the Governing Board of MNGWPD), Dorris Cook Etowah WSA), Jennifer Arp (Environmental Affairs Supervisor CCWSA), Buzz Ahrens (Chairman of the Board of Directors Cherokee County), and David Kubala (Environmental Affairs Manager CCWSA)

(Picture L-R) Danny Johnson (Manager of the MNGPD), Boyd Austin (Chairman of the Governing Board of MNGWPD), Dorris Cook Etowah WSA), Jennifer Arp (Environmental Affairs Supervisor CCWSA), Buzz Ahrens (Chairman of the Board of Directors Cherokee County), and David Kubala (Environmental Affairs Manager CCWSA)

 

2015 Rivers Alive Government Partnership Award

CCWSA received the 2015 Rivers Alive Government Partnership Award for the Little River Clean-up. CCWSA partnered with City of Woodstock and City of Holly Springs for the 2015 river clean-up. It has been a strong partnership for the last 5 years. Volunteers removed over 1,800 pounds of trash from the Etowah River and Little River. The trash collected included interesting items such as a refrigerator door, couch/love seat set (complete with throw pillows), pool ladder, animal trap with animal bones inside, propane tank, and Freon tank. The number one trash item picked up was beverage containers (plastic bottles, glass bottles, and aluminum cans).

(Picture L-R) Doug Fulle (Rivers Alive Board Chairman), Mary Walker (Assistant Director of GA EPD), Lori Forrester (CCWSA Environmental Affairs Specialist), Jennifer Arp (CCWSA Environmental Affairs Supervisor), Jeremy Parker (City of Woodstock Public Works Operations Manager), Josh Rogers (City of Holly Springs Stormwater Coordinator), Nancy Moon (City of Holly Springs Community Development Director) and Greg Roach (City of Woodstock Stormwater Operations Manager).

(Picture L-R) Doug Fulle (Rivers Alive Board Chairman), Mary Walker (Assistant Director of GA EPD), Lori Forrester (CCWSA Environmental Affairs Specialist), Jennifer Arp (CCWSA Environmental Affairs Supervisor), Jeremy Parker (City of Woodstock Public Works Operations Manager), Josh Rogers (City of Holly Springs Stormwater Coordinator), Nancy Moon (City of Holly Springs Community Development Director) and Greg Roach (City of Woodstock Stormwater Operations Manager).

 

2015 -2016 Partner of the Year

CCWSA received Partner of the Year (2015-2016) from Freedom Middle School for the water education programs. The water education programs have been provided to entire 6th grade at Freedom Middle School for the last 4 years.

(Picture L-R) Lori Forrester, Jennifer Arp, and Sheila Grimes (Principal at Freedom Middle School)

(Picture L-R) Lori Forrester, Jennifer Arp, and Sheila Grimes (Principal at Freedom Middle School)

 

CCWSA Drinking Water Is Safe

  • Cherokee County Water & Sewerage Authority is paying close attention to what unfolded in Flint, Michigan, and our thoughts are with all those who are struggling without access to safe and reliable water in their homes. In North America, no one should have to question the safety of water at the tap.
  • Flint underscores that our first job is to protect the persons we serve. Those of us involved in managing, cleaning and delivering water share a solemn obligation to protect public health.
  • We do not have first-hand information about what occurred in Flint, but this much seems clear: When Flint switched its water supply source, it did not take the required steps to manage water chemistry. The new water caused lead to leach from service lines and home plumbing – lead that ended up in water coming out of the taps.
  • Lead does not come from the treatment plants and water mains; it comes from lead service lines running between the water main in the street and the home, and from plumbing inside the home. We do not have lead service lines in our system.
  • This kind of incident is unlikely here. Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority collects samples for lead and copper analysis every three years as required by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, in accordance with federal rules. Because lead and copper enter drinking water primarily through plumbing materials used in individual homes, the US Environmental Protection Agency requires systems to monitor drinking water at customer taps. If lead concentrations exceed an action level of 15 ppb or if copper concentrations exceed an action level of 1.3 ppm in more than 10% of customer taps sampled, the system must undertake a number of additional actions to control corrosion.

Here are the most recent lead and copper results from CCWSA’s sampling:

Lead: 2.5 ppb / 90th percentile, (9/2015)          Lead range: 0.00 ppb – 8.1 ppb (9/2015)

Copper: 0.83 ppm / 90th percentile (9/2015)    Copper range: 0.00 ppm – 1.2ppm (9/2015)

Additionally CCWSA treats our drinking water with an orthophosphate to control corrosion within the water distribution system. The phosphate provides a layer of protection on the walls of the distribution pipes that decreases the potential corrosion of metals into the drinking water. CCWSA monitors corrosion within the water system through a corrosion coupon monitoring program. The program consists of mild steel discs that are placed throughout the distribution system and analyzed on a quarterly basis to determine the corrosion rate. Orthophosphate levels, along with the pH and alkalinity of CCWSA’s finished drinking water, are tested multiple times daily at our water production plant to maintain very high water quality in the distribution system.

  • We are not content to simply comply with regulations. We observe the letter of the law and embrace the spirit of it.
  • If you are a property owner, there are steps you can take to address potential risks from lead in water. Older brass faucets with lead content can be in newer homes. A certified plumber can check for lead solders in your internal pipes and look for fixtures containing lead.