CCWSA Drinking Water Is Safe

  • Cherokee County Water & Sewerage Authority is paying close attention to what unfolded in Flint, Michigan, and our thoughts are with all those who are struggling without access to safe and reliable water in their homes. In North America, no one should have to question the safety of water at the tap.
  • Flint underscores that our first job is to protect the persons we serve. Those of us involved in managing, cleaning and delivering water share a solemn obligation to protect public health.
  • We do not have first-hand information about what occurred in Flint, but this much seems clear: When Flint switched its water supply source, it did not take the required steps to manage water chemistry. The new water caused lead to leach from service lines and home plumbing – lead that ended up in water coming out of the taps.
  • Lead does not come from the treatment plants and water mains; it comes from lead service lines running between the water main in the street and the home, and from plumbing inside the home. We do not have lead service lines in our system.
  • This kind of incident is unlikely here. Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority collects samples for lead and copper analysis every three years as required by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, in accordance with federal rules. Because lead and copper enter drinking water primarily through plumbing materials used in individual homes, the US Environmental Protection Agency requires systems to monitor drinking water at customer taps. If lead concentrations exceed an action level of 15 ppb or if copper concentrations exceed an action level of 1.3 ppm in more than 10% of customer taps sampled, the system must undertake a number of additional actions to control corrosion.

Here are the most recent lead and copper results from CCWSA’s sampling:

Lead: 2.5 ppb / 90th percentile, (9/2015)          Lead range: 0.00 ppb – 8.1 ppb (9/2015)

Copper: 0.83 ppm / 90th percentile (9/2015)    Copper range: 0.00 ppm – 1.2ppm (9/2015)

Additionally CCWSA treats our drinking water with an orthophosphate to control corrosion within the water distribution system. The phosphate provides a layer of protection on the walls of the distribution pipes that decreases the potential corrosion of metals into the drinking water. CCWSA monitors corrosion within the water system through a corrosion coupon monitoring program. The program consists of mild steel discs that are placed throughout the distribution system and analyzed on a quarterly basis to determine the corrosion rate. Orthophosphate levels, along with the pH and alkalinity of CCWSA’s finished drinking water, are tested multiple times daily at our water production plant to maintain very high water quality in the distribution system.

  • We are not content to simply comply with regulations. We observe the letter of the law and embrace the spirit of it.
  • If you are a property owner, there are steps you can take to address potential risks from lead in water. Older brass faucets with lead content can be in newer homes. A certified plumber can check for lead solders in your internal pipes and look for fixtures containing lead.

Science Fair Winners 2016

Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) recognized six Cherokee County students during the Northwest Georgia Regional Science and Engineering Fair on January 30th at West Forsyth High School. There were four projects recognized for their excellence in the environmental field. The projects recognized were How does Magnetism Impact the Growth of Radish Plants and their Roots?” from Alyssa Golden (Etowah High School), “Watershed Pollution” from Madison Beavers, Bella Frey, and Kora Hansen (Indian Knoll Elementary), The Effects of Bioactivators on Worm Castings” from Eliza Ndow (Woodstock High School), and “Use of Carbon Nanoparticles for Aqueous Heavy Metal Remediation Yr2”  from Krystl Wood (Woodstock High School).The students received a certificate and $50 gift card. CCWSA applauds the efforts of all the Cherokee County students.

Krystl Wood (Winner) & Lori Forrester (CCWSA Environmental Affairs Specialist) During The Awards Ceremony

Krystl Wood (Winner) & Lori Forrester (CCWSA Environmental Affairs Specialist) During The Awards Ceremony

Excellently Displayed Watershed Pollution Project By 6th Grade Team Madison, Bella & Kora - Indian Knoll

Excellently Displayed Watershed Pollution Project By 6th Grade Team Madison, Bella & Kora – Indian Knoll Elementary

NORTHWEST GEORGIA REGIONAL SCIENCE & ENGINEERING FAIR

Photo Contest Winners 2015

Cherokee County Water and Sewerage Authority (CCWSA) is pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 CCWSA photography contest. Audrey Hopkins, 1st grade student from Macedonia Elementary School, is the winner in the K – 6th grade category. Maddie Leslie, 11th grade student from Woodstock High School, is the winner in the 7th through 12th grade category. The winning photographs beautifully depicted the waters of the Etowah River Watershed that provides quality drinking water to CCWSA customers.  Both students were presented their framed winning photograph and a check for $50 in front of their peers. The photographs will be displayed at the CCWSA main office, Environmental Affairs office, Rose Creek WRF, Fitzgerald Creek WRF, Etowah River WTF, and H. Q. Lathem Reservoir. Thank you to all the students who participated in the photography contest!

Audrey Hopkins (with her winning photograph) and her mother Brooke Hopkins at Macedonia Elementary School

Audrey Hopkins (with her winning photograph) and her mother Brooke Hopkins at Macedonia Elementary School

Maddie Leslie (with her winning photograph and check) and Lori Forrester, CCWSA Environmental Affairs Specialist, at Woodstock High School

Maddie Leslie (with her winning photograph and check) and Lori Forrester, CCWSA Environmental Affairs Specialist, at Woodstock High School

River Clean Up Success

The local Fall (September/October) Rivers Alive Clean-ups in Cherokee County were a success thanks to the 80 volunteers that worked a total of 340 hours over an area of 8 river miles. Volunteers removed over 1,800 pounds of trash from the Etowah River and Little River. The trash collected included interesting items such as a refrigerator door, couch/love seat set (complete with throw pillows), pool ladder, animal trap with animal bones inside, propane tank, and Freon tank. The number one trash item picked up was beverage containers (plastic bottles, glass bottles, and aluminum cans). Volunteers picked up over 2000 beverage containers! We can all be more responsible while out in the community by properly disposing of our trash. 

River_Cleanup_2015_3Hard Working Group At The Little River Clean Up

River_Cleanup_2015_1Students Get Acquainted With The
Etowah River Alliance Mascot
Carter The Darter

River_Cleanup_2015_4Canoe Of Trash Removed From The Little River
It Doesn’t Take Long To Accumulate!

River_Cleanup_2015_2Couch And Love Seat
Removed From The Etowah River

THANK YOU to all volunteers!  We couldn’t have done it without you.
See you next year!

 

2015 Student Photography Contest

CCWSA is conducting a photography contest in which the photograph depicts the “Beauty Of Our Water Resources”. The contest is open to all Cherokee County students K-12 (including home school students).  Click here for more information.